World War One;- The Western Front

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Many of us today have never been to war, we don't know what it is like to see mass-murders and we don't know what really occurred. This assignment on world war one gives both a story and facts.

Submitted: July 26, 2011

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Submitted: July 26, 2011

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For our soldiers it had been a long and emotional battle keeping the Turks at bay, when I enlisted as a doctor I never thought that the war would turn out to be this fierce. Towards the end of 1915 we had successfully retreated from the shores of Gallipoli, and we were off to the western front. Aboard transport we felt the emptiness, we had lost some 60,000 men of which some were friends and some were family. Comforting those who had suffered severely had taken it’s toll, tiredness and fatigue had set in making this relatively short  journey seem to be one of the longest expeditions ever conquered.  Those who had not been killed though had been wounded during the conflict were displaying symptoms of infection and tinea, with out antibiotics it was thought that they would surely die though most of them hung in their friends saying that “the extra morphine had done them well”.  The tactic of the journey was to travel 2253.98 kilometers  by sea and rail to western front of France where we would spend six days in training. We were told to be well prepared as the Germans had been practicing all year whilst we were in Gallipoli.  On April 22 1915 war on the western front had began, in just five days we had suffered from more casualties than those in Gallipoli. The hospitals were filled with soldiers from a wide range of battalions most of which had been effected due to the cause of German troops releasing thousands of cylinders filled with deadly chlorine gas and  ammonia.  A week into the battle the soldiers trenches were rapidly filling  with deceased bodies, rodents and  heavy artillery  which had made them seem un-livable though with a cheery glint in their eye they continued to fight even though it was noticeable by now that they were deeply depressed. On the 11th November 1918 the sound of fire and bombing finally ceased, for the Australian troops it could only mean good news war had finished and we were returning home. Many of us were eager  to get back to our normal lives that we had left behind  though part of us knew that we would miss the friends we had so dearly made through the battle though we had come up with a plan to see each other at least once a month. Returning home could bring no greater pride, hearing the cheers and seeing the smiles of those who we had worked so hard to set free brought a tear to everyone's eye. Stepping through the front door of our homes and into the comfort of our friends and family for the first time in years brought even more tears, the feeling that we were home and nothing could change that had overcome all of us. Days later we received a letter from the Prime Minister stating that every year on the 25 of April Australia would celebrate the anniversary of World WAR ones end date. To this date we continue to celebrate ANZAC  Day, soldiers may have passed on though they will be remembered for everything, people may die though the freedom will forever live on. Lest We Forget.
 
 
 
Towards the middle of 1915 World WAR one had begun and was well underway, with their figures rapidly dropping Australian soldiers needed reinforcements now more than ever. Hearing the cry for help people from a wide range of religions, occupations and ages wanted to become part of the Australian forces in which enlistment was a crucial process. Completing the forms allowed the Government to set up ‘Soldier profiles’ which allowed Commanders, Nurses and Doctors to refer to if a soldier was suspected missing or un-lawfully killed. During the time of enlistment we would also undergo a series of medical tests (blood, urine and hearing) as well as undergoing a series of exams to determine our mental ability. Enlistments who where found to have a serious medical condition where unable to be accepted for medical reasons. Those of us  who where successfully accepted had just two days to say good-by to our families before we where sent to Cairo, Egypt where we would undergo an intensive four and a half month training program. It was designed to push enlisted soldiers to their ultimate extreme, in which their trainers would pay specific attention to the weakest. For myself I was only five years into my medical training in university, others like myself who had not yet completed the full ten years of medicine before enlisting where also intensively trained in medical areas that we had not learnt yet. After arriving in Gallipoli we had already halved our number of soldiers from 416, 809 to 275,690in just three days. With fears from the Australian Government that the number of soldiers would drop significantly they decided to make their articles and posters more convincing in order to get even more people to enlist by stating that “Our family is at war, all Australians are family and a family looks after each other”. The recruiting committee had come up with a simple idea which was to enlist the soldiers in the usual matter  though instead of sending them strait to Gallipoli they would go into the army reserve which could be called upon at any stage during the war. While in Gallipoli the thing that lifted us was a letter from home. The pressure was raised as many of us felt we where home, to hear that we were doing something that was making others feel safe was truly a warm feeling.
 
 
For the western front peace could rise again as an eerie silence fell across the battlefields, we where leaving with a heavy heart. After spending (figure) months and loosing (total) men world war one had finally ceased and we could return home. Soldiers who feared returning home to nothing feared no more for through the battles we had become strong friends and accomplished so much. For some of us after arriving home to Australia in 1918 settling into normal everyday life was not as easy as we hoped it to be. The depression had made finding a job difficult for return soldiers as some were forced to sell pegs door to door or on the side of the road while some obtained a Government pay-out in which they were forced to move from town to town before the next payment which tore apart families. With receiving only very limited amounts of money an escalation of violence broke out resulting in the divorce of many soldiers which further complicated their mental stability. After all of these occurrences happening many of us regretted going to war in which the purpose was to help our ally Great Britain stop Germany from killing innocent people. A war this severe was to never happen again though it did in world war two which was twice as fierce claiming over sixty million lives many of which where civilians. Years after the war some still suffered from flashbacks and nightmares, ramifications which had affected them severely.
 To the future generations of Australia;
After enduring the prolonged effects of world war one I firmly stand by my beliefs that war should never have occurred. If it wasn’t for the lives that where lost you may not have had the freedom that you do today. To ensure war never occurs again you should be free to allow you religious beliefs to direct you into the path of wisdom, let people speak and be heard by the Governments as lives should not be lost for their blunders, feel free to live your life and become things as you would as well as treating your friends and family with the respect and courtesy that they deserve. It is most important of all to remember that everyone is equal, no-one is superior and everyone should be treated the same. Live, love and cherish everyday of your life. Lest we forget.
 

 

 

Written By James Dzintarnieks 2011, copyrights reserved.

 
 
 

 


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