A Prayer

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Memoir  |  House: Booksie Classic
The ray of light slowly entered through the horizon. A few drops of rain touched his feet. The dawn of wisdom!!.

Submitted: September 29, 2014

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Submitted: September 29, 2014

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A prayer ......

 

The whole city had been darkened strangely that night. There were no stars in the sky . Some street dogs had been barking continuously. It annoyed everyone . The old man who was sitting on the wooden bench chanted the mantras loudly as if he got scared of the darkness.

 

 The mysterious hooting owl in one of the branches of the tree made the night more superstitious. A crowd passed by who were not bothered about the unrhythmic blowing of  wind which was rocking everywhere!.

 

The old man closed his eyes tightly and continued his chants briskly. A small boy who was running on through the footpath came and sat near him then touched his white long beard but he was unaware of that. After a while  the boy also went away with his mother. The street became 'empty' but the dog, the owl and the old man were remained.

 

The owl swiftly flew and sat on the edge of the wooden bench. Slowly the dog  stopped its growling and sat near to his legs. The man but continued his chants. The wind continued its rocking.The darkness remained as it was. The man again brisked up his chants.

 

After some time, the man stopped suddenly  and raised his eyes and hands together into the sky as if he saw someone there.The ray of light slowly entered through the horizon. A few drops of rain touched his feet. The dawn of wisdom!!.

 

The raining started heavily. The crowd moved on to their destinations. No one was bothered about the rain or the old man or his chants or even the darkened night. The day began with the bright sun as well and as usual...

 

 

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