Stand On Guard

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic

The First Chapter from my book "How Canada Could Rule the World: Strange Political Ideas From a Willing Collaborator"

INTRODUCTION

 

CANADIAN WORLD DOMINATION. Yes, I am being completely serious. The concept is usually just the subject of satire (check out www.standingonguard.com). However, I have studied world history, political geography, and international affairs my whole life, and I am here to tell you that when it comes to the idea of a New World Order molded in Canada’s image, it can be done.

 

I know most people would have thought Canada’s neighbor to the south to be the more likely to make plans for creating a global empire. Had they done so, sentiments from the international community would range from anxiety to annoyance. But if Canada seriously proposed such plans of conquest, outside reaction would probably range between confusion and, “awe that’s so cute”.

 

Even if it does not seem like Canada is going to plant their maple-leaf banner on beach-heads across every ocean, I would think twice before underestimating their abilities. Nobody took it seriously when someone wrote a book about German world dominance, but that might not be a good example.

 

Sir Wilfred Laurier (the first French-Canadian Prime Minister who was in office from 1896-1911) believed that just as the 1800s were seen as America’s century, the 1900s would be Canada’s. History shows that Mr. Laurier miscalculated how long the United States would remain in the limelight. However, at the dawn of the new millennium, it is starting to become evident that American hegemony is not eternal, so the prophecy might yet come true.

 

Many Americans might assume that only Canadians think highly of Canada. They probably think that any outside praise of Canada is limited to Third World refugees trying to escape war and poverty, who couldn’t get into the United States. Well, as a U.S. citizen I am already fortunate to know First World living standards and grateful for it, but I still think Canada kicks ass.

 

I come from a family that took me camping as far back as I can remember, so from an early age I have held a very positive impression of Canada. Also, having lived through eight years of the presidency of George W. Bush, I found a lot more reasons to be envious of my neighbor to the north.

 

You will have to decide for yourself how serious or satirical I am being when I say this, but I will full heartedly offer my services to the glory of building a great Canadian empire. It would not be the first time that a nationalist movement was spearheaded by someone who was foreign born. Hitler after all was born in Austria not Germany, but again that might not be a good example.

 

Though I am probably still not going to be taken seriously about Canadian empire building, I believe some great intuition can be gained by imagining “what if”. By imagining how Canada could pursue this, we can review Empire Building 101. It can help us to understand the nationalism that has sometimes morphed into a hunger for imperial ambitions. Countries have often taken action as if all of the other nations of the world didn’t exist. This can be a conflict of interests between countries that have to share the same planet.

 

Canada is good about realizing that in the age of globalization that they must live side by side with other countries, but nations will still try to work for their own interests within that context. It’s a thorn in the ass for anyone who dreams of world unity, but it teaches us about how we form our sense of identity. It gives us the sense of patriotism that sometimes leads to wars and conquest carving up the world. The modern age makes us ask if in an interconnected world seen as one there can still be a future sense of identity for any of our individual nations, or if by preserving our national identities if we can still see the Earth as one, and by asking “what if”, I will seek an answer to that.

 

For anyone who shares the dream of a better future for the human race, you too are an advocate for Canadian world domination, even if you don’t know it yet. Canada is not only a place but a state of mind. Like the draft dodgers of the 1960s many of us can see Canada as a metaphor for a more just and harmonious society. Not everyone calls this dream by the name “Canada”, but a maple leaf by any other name is still beautiful. So even if you never thought of your self as an advocate for Canadian nationalism, if you believe in the dream, then this book is for you. In its pages you might even find the key to world peace or at least a better course of action than the one that people like Bush have steered us on.

 

This is meant to be a book of ideas. Admittedly, some of these ideas might seem a bit unorthodox, but new ideas often are. If we relied completely on politicians to come up with new ideas then nothing would ever get done. Finally, so I do not seem too much like an opinionated asshole, I want to state that these are just ideas. They are probably imperfect, just like I and everyone else is. Although ideologues of all political persuasions usually forget this, remember that ideas are meant to serve the people, not the other way around.

 

I might get critical, very critical of the United States government, but that doesn’t mean I dislike the United States. Furthermore, although I try to make some serious statements, I do not mean EVERYTHING I say to be taken completely seriously. So if you use what I write to assume I hate my own country, you need to lighten the hell up.

 

And perhaps there are indeed a couple of Canadians, or wanna-be Canadians like myself, who held a glimmer of hope that this book might indeed offer a true plan for a Canada more powerful and expansive than it is now. I certainly wouldn’t want to disappoint them.

 


Submitted: January 29, 2012

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