Screen on Contempt by Margaret Code

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Flash Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
A short story on contempt

Submitted: December 04, 2009

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Submitted: December 04, 2009

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Screen of Contempt
 
Georgina Granada lived in a large 4-beroom house in an affluent area of Toronto. She had matching furniture and appliances that were colour-coordinated. She drove 2 cars, belonged to a gym, traveled now and then and afforded luxuries through well paying jobs in her second career in financial advisory services. (Her first was in banking where she rose to the level of Senior Associate.) Pleasingly plump and not unattractive for a woman in her sixties, Georgina kept her short grey hair neat and well cut and was active in solo sports activities like running to keep fit. A devotee of the latest technology, the only humanizing influence in her life was her little terrier, Mutt, whom she doted on and spoiled.
Georgina had unfortunately just lost the third in a series of high paying positions. In her second career, she’d had a position between the first and the second, but it was commission and not as lucrative as had been hoped for. The first, in banking, had been terminated due to lengthy litigation with her employer over discrimination against women that wore out her welcome to put it mildly. The second had been lost due to a gradually increased isolation she had created for herself in order to protect herself from the judgments of others. Being a single older woman she felt out of place at lunch tables where younger women would discuss their marriages and children. Perhaps she didn’t feel she could contribute, but possibly she was jealous of the happiness these women had achieved and so chose to withdraw into her work and personal errands at lunch time. Perhaps, too, excessive amounts of time taken off work might have had a lot to do with her termination. The third she had lost either due to a personality that had become over the years, automatically contentious or to the loss of a contract by her employer. They said they would take her back under different circumstances, but probably the barrage of outraged emails she sent them when they let her go abruptly and unceremoniously will have cut off that opportunity.
Her outrage at this employer was typical of how she reacted in situations where things didn’t go her way. The fault always lay with the other person or persons. They were indescribably “horrible” to her. They were totally lacking in sensitivity and their social graces didn’t meet the bare minimum. Georgina had probably heard of the Roman Maxim: Seek always the golden mean, but she knew it had no application in her life. Any time she tried to be decent to people, they treated her horribly. And there was only one way to deal with conflict in Georgina’s mind: twenty paces, both guns drawn. Even a casual observer might conclude with all the litigation she became embroiled in, she must enjoy it. The many conflicts that came her way often ended up in court and Georgina eventually decided she would like to be a lawyer though the time of life was right for embarking on a new career. This was after she had been charged with mischief and, after hiring the most expensive lawyer in town, been let off with a Peace Bond. She was no angel, this woman. Her motto was tit for tat. If someone blocked her driveway, she would block theirs. If someone, criticized her, she would dish the same back…without giving much thought to the possible validity of the other’s criticism. If a neighbour charged her with assault for turning the hose on them, she would find some by-law infraction they were guilty of and bring the force of city inspectors down on them.
Basically, she treated anyone who dared to oppose her with the utmost contempt. She would run them down in her mind and to anyone willing to listen. Naturally, the person, she might be trying to be civil to would sense her contempt even when unspoken and her efforts at civility would fail. Little wonder she would feel civility was useless.
So little self-awareness did Georgina have, anyone who knew her well felt sorry for her if they had enough insight to see the self-inflicted aspect of the troubles she brought upon herself. A very astute person might see the contempt as a psychological defense mechanism designed to protect her from feelings of failure when relationships did not blossom into friendships. Even though she could manage to get herself hired into well paying jobs, she could not hold onto them so, rich in material possessions, contempt when someone is on their way downwards, is very easy to judge.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Georgina Granada lived in a large 4-beroom house in an affluent area of Toronto. She had matching furniture and appliances that were colour-coordinated. She drove 2 cars, belonged to a gym, traveled now and then and afforded luxuries through well paying jobs in her second career in financial advisory services. (Her first was in banking where she rose to the level of Senior Associate.) Pleasingly plump and not unattractive for a woman in her sixties, Georgina kept her short grey hair neat and well cut and was active in solo sports activities like running to keep fit. A devotee of the latest technology, the only humanizing influence in her life was her little terrier, Mutt, whom she doted on and spoiled.
 Georgina had unfortunately just lost the third in a series of high paying positions. In her second career, she’d had a position between the first and the second, but it was commission and not as lucrative as had been hoped for. The first, in banking, had been terminated due to lengthy litigation with her employer over discrimination against women that wore out her welcome to put it mildly. The second had been lost due to a gradually increased isolation she had created for herself in order to protect herself from the judgments of others. Being a single older woman she felt out of place at lunch tables where younger women would discuss their marriages and children. Perhaps she didn’t feel she could contribute, but possibly she was jealous of the happiness these women had achieved and so chose to withdraw into her work and personal errands at lunch time. Perhaps, too, excessive amounts of time taken off work might have had a lot to do with her termination. The third she had lost either due to a personality that had become over the years, automatically contentious or to the loss of a contract by her employer. They said they would take her back under different circumstances, but probably the barrage of outraged emails she sent them when they let her go abruptly and unceremoniously will have cut off that opportunity.
Her outrage at this employer was typical of how she reacted in situations where things didn’t go her way. The fault always lay with the other person or persons. They were indescribably “horrible” to her. They were totally lacking in sensitivity and their social graces didn’t meet the bare minimum. Georgina had probably heard of the Roman Maxim: Seek always the golden mean, but she knew it had no application in her life. Any time she tried to be decent to people, they treated her horribly. And there was only one way to deal with conflict in Georgina’s mind: twenty paces, both guns drawn. Even a casual observer might conclude with all the litigation she became embroiled in, she must enjoy it. The many conflicts that came her way often ended up in court and Georgina eventually decided she would like to be a lawyer though the time of life was right for embarking on a new career. This was after she had been charged with mischief and, after hiring the most expensive lawyer in town, been let off with a Peace Bond. She was no angel, this woman. Her motto was tit for tat. If someone blocked her driveway, she would block theirs. If someone, criticized her, she would dish the same back…without giving much thought to the possible validity of the other’s criticism. If a neighbour charged her with assault for turning the hose on them, she would find some by-law infraction they were guilty of and bring the force of city inspectors down on them.
Basically, she treated anyone who dared to oppose her with the utmost contempt. She would run them down in her mind and to anyone willing to listen. Naturally, the person, she might be trying to be civil to would sense her contempt even when unspoken and her efforts at civility would fail. Little wonder she would feel civility was useless.
So little self-awareness did Georgina have, anyone who knew her well felt sorry for her if they had enough insight to see the self-inflicted aspect of the troubles she brought upon herself. A very astute person might see the contempt as a psychological defense mechanism designed to protect her from feelings of failure when relationships did not blossom into friendships. Even though she could manage to get herself hired into well paying jobs, she could not hold onto them so, rich in material possessions, contempt when someone is on their way downwards, is very easy to judge.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Screen of Contempt
 
Georgina Granada lived in a large 4-beroom house in an affluent area of Toronto. She had matching furniture and appliances that were colour-coordinated. She drove 2 cars, belonged to a gym, traveled now and then and afforded luxuries through well paying jobs in her second career in financial advisory services. (Her first was in banking where she rose to the level of Senior Associate.) Pleasingly plump and not unattractive for a woman in her sixties, Georgina kept her short grey hair neat and well cut and was active in solo sports activities like running to keep fit. A devotee of the latest technology, the only humanizing influence in her life was her little terrier, Mutt, whom she doted on and spoiled.
Georgina had unfortunately just lost the third in a series of high paying positions. In her second career, she’d had a position between the first and the second, but it was commission and not as lucrative as had been hoped for. The first, in banking, had been terminated due to lengthy litigation with her employer over discrimination against women that wore out her welcome to put it mildly. The second had been lost due to a gradually increased isolation she had created for herself in order to protect herself from the judgments of others. Being a single older woman she felt out of place at lunch tables where younger women would discuss their marriages and children. Perhaps she didn’t feel she could contribute, but possibly she was jealous of the happiness these women had achieved and so chose to withdraw into her work and personal errands at lunch time. Perhaps, too, excessive amounts of time taken off work might have had a lot to do with her termination. The third she had lost either due to a personality that had become over the years, automatically contentious or to the loss of a contract by her employer. They said they would take her back under different circumstances, but probably the barrage of outraged emails she sent them when they let her go abruptly and unceremoniously will have cut off that opportunity.
Her outrage at this employer was typical of how she reacted in situations where things didn’t go her way. The fault always lay with the other person or persons. They were indescribably “horrible” to her. They were totally lacking in sensitivity and their social graces didn’t meet the bare minimum. Georgina had probably heard of the Roman Maxim: Seek always the golden mean, but she knew it had no application in her life. Any time she tried to be decent to people, they treated her horribly. And there was only one way to deal with conflict in Georgina’s mind: twenty paces, both guns drawn. Even a casual observer might conclude with all the litigation she became embroiled in, she must enjoy it. The many conflicts that came her way often ended up in court and Georgina eventually decided she would like to be a lawyer though the time of life was right for embarking on a new career. This was after she had been charged with mischief and, after hiring the most expensive lawyer in town, been let off with a Peace Bond. She was no angel, this woman. Her motto was tit for tat. If someone blocked her driveway, she would block theirs. If someone, criticized her, she would dish the same back…without giving much thought to the possible validity of the other’s criticism. If a neighbour charged her with assault for turning the hose on them, she would find some by-law infraction they were guilty of and bring the force of city inspectors down on them.
Basically, she treated anyone who dared to oppose her with the utmost contempt. She would run them down in her mind and to anyone willing to listen. Naturally, the person, she might be trying to be civil to would sense her contempt even when unspoken and her efforts at civility would fail. Little wonder she would feel civility was useless.
So little self-awareness did Georgina have, anyone who knew her well felt sorry for her if they had enough insight to see the self-inflicted aspect of the troubles she brought upon herself. A very astute person might see the contempt as a psychological defense mechanism designed to protect her from feelings of failure when relationships did not blossom into friendships. Even though she could manage to get herself hired into well paying jobs, she could not hold onto them so, rich in material possessions, contempt when someone is on their way downwards, is very easy to judge.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Screen of Contempt
 
Georgina Granada lived in a large 4-beroom house in an affluent area of Toronto. She had matching furniture and appliances that were colour-coordinated. She drove 2 cars, belonged to a gym, traveled now and then and afforded luxuries through well paying jobs in her second career in financial advisory services. (Her first was in banking where she rose to the level of Senior Associate.) Pleasingly plump and not unattractive for a woman in her sixties, Georgina kept her short grey hair neat and well cut and was active in solo sports activities like running to keep fit. A devotee of the latest technology, the only humanizing influence in her life was her little terrier, Mutt, whom she doted on and spoiled.
Georgina had unfortunately just lost the third in a series of high paying positions. In her second career, she’d had a position between the first and the second, but it was commission and not as lucrative as had been hoped for. The first, in banking, had been terminated due to lengthy litigation with her employer over discrimination against women that wore out her welcome to put it mildly. The second had been lost due to a gradually increased isolation she had created for herself in order to protect herself from the judgments of others. Being a single older woman she felt out of place at lunch tables where younger women would discuss their marriages and children. Perhaps she didn’t feel she could contribute, but possibly she was jealous of the happiness these women had achieved and so chose to withdraw into her work and personal errands at lunch time. Perhaps, too, excessive amounts of time taken off work might have had a lot to do with her termination. The third she had lost either due to a personality that had become over the years, automatically contentious or to the loss of a contract by her employer. They said they would take her back under different circumstances, but probably the barrage of outraged emails she sent them when they let her go abruptly and unceremoniously will have cut off that opportunity.
Her outrage at this employer was typical of how she reacted in situations where things didn’t go her way. The fault always lay with the other person or persons. They were indescribably “horrible” to her. They were totally lacking in sensitivity and their social graces didn’t meet the bare minimum. Georgina had probably heard of the Roman Maxim: Seek always the golden mean, but she knew it had no application in her life. Any time she tried to be decent to people, they treated her horribly. And there was only one way to deal with conflict in Georgina’s mind: twenty paces, both guns drawn. Even a casual observer might conclude with all the litigation she became embroiled in, she must enjoy it. The many conflicts that came her way often ended up in court and Georgina eventually decided she would like to be a lawyer though the time of life was right for embarking on a new career. This was after she had been charged with mischief and, after hiring the most expensive lawyer in town, been let off with a Peace Bond. She was no angel, this woman. Her motto was tit for tat. If someone blocked her driveway, she would block theirs. If someone, criticized her, she would dish the same back…without giving much thought to the possible validity of the other’s criticism. If a neighbour charged her with assault for turning the hose on them, she would find some by-law infraction they were guilty of and bring the force of city inspectors down on them.
Basically, she treated anyone who dared to oppose her with the utmost contempt. She would run them down in her mind and to anyone willing to listen. Naturally, the person, she might be trying to be civil to would sense her contempt even when unspoken and her efforts at civility would fail. Little wonder she would feel civility was useless.
So little self-awareness did Georgina have, anyone who knew her well felt sorry for her if they had enough insight to see the self-inflicted aspect of the troubles she brought upon herself. A very astute person might see the contempt as a psychological defense mechanism designed to protect her from feelings of failure when relationships did not blossom into friendships. Even though she could manage to get herself hired into well paying jobs, she could not hold onto them so, rich in material possessions, contempt when someone is on their way downwards, is very easy to judge.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Screen of Contempt
 
Georgina Granada lived in a large 4-beroom house in an affluent area of Toronto. She had matching furniture and appliances that were colour-coordinated. She drove 2 cars, belonged to a gym, traveled now and then and afforded luxuries through well paying jobs in her second career in financial advisory services. (Her first was in banking where she rose to the level of Senior Associate.) Pleasingly plump and not unattractive for a woman in her sixties, Georgina kept her short grey hair neat and well cut and was active in solo sports activities like running to keep fit. A devotee of the latest technology, the only humanizing influence in her life was her little terrier, Mutt, whom she doted on and spoiled.
Georgina had unfortunately just lost the third in a series of high paying positions. In her second career, she’d had a position between the first and the second, but it was commission and not as lucrative as had been hoped for. The first, in banking, had been terminated due to lengthy litigation with her employer over discrimination against women that wore out her welcome to put it mildly. The second had been lost due to a gradually increased isolation she had created for herself in order to protect herself from the judgments of others. Being a single older woman she felt out of place at lunch tables where younger women would discuss their marriages and children. Perhaps she didn’t feel she could contribute, but possibly she was jealous of the happiness these women had achieved and so chose to withdraw into her work and personal errands at lunch time. Perhaps, too, excessive amounts of time taken off work might have had a lot to do with her termination. The third she had lost either due to a personality that had become over the years, automatically contentious or to the loss of a contract by her employer. They said they would take her back under different circumstances, but probably the barrage of outraged emails she sent them when they let her go abruptly and unceremoniously will have cut off that opportunity.
Her outrage at this employer was typical of how she reacted in situations where things didn’t go her way. The fault always lay with the other person or persons. They were indescribably “horrible” to her. They were totally lacking in sensitivity and their social graces didn’t meet the bare minimum. Georgina had probably heard of the Roman Maxim: Seek always the golden mean, but she knew it had no application in her life. Any time she tried to be decent to people, they treated her horribly. And there was only one way to deal with conflict in Georgina’s mind: twenty paces, both guns drawn. Even a casual observer might conclude with all the litigation she became embroiled in, she must enjoy it. The many conflicts that came her way often ended up in court and Georgina eventually decided she would like to be a lawyer though the time of life was right for embarking on a new career. This was after she had been charged with mischief and, after hiring the most expensive lawyer in town, been let off with a Peace Bond. She was no angel, this woman. Her motto was tit for tat. If someone blocked her driveway, she would block theirs. If someone, criticized her, she would dish the same back…without giving much thought to the possible validity of the other’s criticism. If a neighbour charged her with assault for turning the hose on them, she would find some by-law infraction they were guilty of and bring the force of city inspectors down on them.
Basically, she treated anyone who dared to oppose her with the utmost contempt. She would run them down in her mind and to anyone willing to listen. Naturally, the person, she might be trying to be civil to would sense her contempt even when unspoken and her efforts at civility would fail. Little wonder she would feel civility was useless.
So little self-awareness did Georgina have, anyone who knew her well felt sorry for her if they had enough insight to see the self-inflicted aspect of the troubles she brought upon herself. A very astute person might see the contempt as a psychological defense mechanism designed to protect her from feelings of failure when relationships did not blossom into friendships. Even though she could manage to get herself hired into well paying jobs, she could not hold onto them so, rich in material possessions, contempt when someone is on their way downwards, is very easy to judge.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Screen of Contempt
 
Georgina Granada lived in a large 4-beroom house in an affluent area of Toronto. She had matching furniture and appliances that were colour-coordinated. She drove 2 cars, belonged to a gym, traveled now and then and afforded luxuries through well paying jobs in her second career in financial advisory services. (Her first was in banking where she rose to the level of Senior Associate.) Pleasingly plump and not unattractive for a woman in her sixties, Georgina kept her short grey hair neat and well cut and was active in solo sports activities like running to keep fit. A devotee of the latest technology, the only humanizing influence in her life was her little terrier, Mutt, whom she doted on and spoiled.
Georgina had unfortunately just lost the third in a series of high paying positions. In her second career, she’d had a position between the first and the second, but it was commission and not as lucrative as had been hoped for. The first, in banking, had been terminated due to lengthy litigation with her employer over discrimination against women that wore out her welcome to put it mildly. The second had been lost due to a gradually increased isolation she had created for herself in order to protect herself from the judgments of others. Being a single older woman she felt out of place at lunch tables where younger women would discuss their marriages and children. Perhaps she didn’t feel she could contribute, but possibly she was jealous of the happiness these women had achieved and so chose to withdraw into her work and personal errands at lunch time. Perhaps, too, excessive amounts of time taken off work might have had a lot to do with her termination. The third she had lost either due to a personality that had become over the years, automatically contentious or to the loss of a contract by her employer. They said they would take her back under different circumstances, but probably the barrage of outraged emails she sent them when they let her go abruptly and unceremoniously will have cut off that opportunity.
Her outrage at this employer was typical of how she reacted in situations where things didn’t go her way. The fault always lay with the other person or persons. They were indescribably “horrible” to her. They were totally lacking in sensitivity and their social graces didn’t meet the bare minimum. Georgina had probably heard of the Roman Maxim: Seek always the golden mean, but she knew it had no application in her life. Any time she tried to be decent to people, they treated her horribly. And there was only one way to deal with conflict in Georgina’s mind: twenty paces, both guns drawn. Even a casual observer might conclude with all the litigation she became embroiled in, she must enjoy it. The many conflicts that came her way often ended up in court and Georgina eventually decided she would like to be a lawyer though the time of life was right for embarking on a new career. This was after she had been charged with mischief and, after hiring the most expensive lawyer in town, been let off with a Peace Bond. She was no angel, this woman. Her motto was tit for tat. If someone blocked her driveway, she would block theirs. If someone, criticized her, she would dish the same back…without giving much thought to the possible validity of the other’s criticism. If a neighbour charged her with assault for turning the hose on them, she would find some by-law infraction they were guilty of and bring the force of city inspectors down on them.
Basically, she treated anyone who dared to oppose her with the utmost contempt. She would run them down in her mind and to anyone willing to listen. Naturally, the person, she might be trying to be civil to would sense her contempt even when unspoken and her efforts at civility would fail. Little wonder she would feel civility was useless.
So little self-awareness did Georgina have, anyone who knew her well felt sorry for her if they had enough insight to see the self-inflicted aspect of the troubles she brought upon herself. A very astute person might see the contempt as a psychological defense mechanism designed to protect her from feelings of failure when relationships did not blossom into friendships. Even though she could manage to get herself hired into well paying jobs, she could not hold onto them so, rich in material possessions, contempt when someone is on their way downwards, is very easy to judge.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Screen of Contempt
 
Georgina Granada lived in a large 4-beroom house in an affluent area of Toronto. She had matching furniture and appliances that were colour-coordinated. She drove 2 cars, belonged to a gym, traveled now and then and afforded luxuries through well paying jobs in her second career in financial advisory services. (Her first was in banking where she rose to the level of Senior Associate.) Pleasingly plump and not unattractive for a woman in her sixties, Georgina kept her short grey hair neat and well cut and was active in solo sports activities like running to keep fit. A devotee of the latest technology, the only humanizing influence in her life was her little terrier, Mutt, whom she doted on and spoiled.
Georgina had unfortunately just lost the third in a series of high paying positions. In her second career, she’d had a position between the first and the second, but it was commission and not as lucrative as had been hoped for. The first, in banking, had been terminated due to lengthy litigation with her employer over discrimination against women that wore out her welcome to put it mildly. The second had been lost due to a gradually increased isolation she had created for herself in order to protect herself from the judgments of others. Being a single older woman she felt out of place at lunch tables where younger women would discuss their marriages and children. Perhaps she didn’t feel she could contribute, but possibly she was jealous of the happiness these women had achieved and so chose to withdraw into her work and personal errands at lunch time. Perhaps, too, excessive amounts of time taken off work might have had a lot to do with her termination. The third she had lost either due to a personality that had become over the years, automatically contentious or to the loss of a contract by her employer. They said they would take her back under different circumstances, but probably the barrage of outraged emails she sent them when they let her go abruptly and unceremoniously will have cut off that opportunity.
Her outrage at this employer was typical of how she reacted in situations where things didn’t go her way. The fault always lay with the other person or persons. They were indescribably “horrible” to her. They were totally lacking in sensitivity and their social graces didn’t meet the bare minimum. Georgina had probably heard of the Roman Maxim: Seek always the golden mean, but she knew it had no application in her life. Any time she tried to be decent to people, they treated her horribly. And there was only one way to deal with conflict in Georgina’s mind: twenty paces, both guns drawn. Even a casual observer might conclude with all the litigation she became embroiled in, she must enjoy it. The many conflicts that came her way often ended up in court and Georgina eventually decided she would like to be a lawyer though the time of life was right for embarking on a new career. This was after she had been charged with mischief and, after hiring the most expensive lawyer in town, been let off with a Peace Bond. She was no angel, this woman. Her motto was tit for tat. If someone blocked her driveway, she would block theirs. If someone, criticized her, she would dish the same back…without giving much thought to the possible validity of the other’s criticism. If a neighbour charged her with assault for turning the hose on them, she would find some by-law infraction they were guilty of and bring the force of city inspectors down on them.
Basically, she treated anyone who dared to oppose her with the utmost contempt. She would run them down in her mind and to anyone willing to listen. Naturally, the person, she might be trying to be civil to would sense her contempt even when unspoken and her efforts at civility would fail. Little wonder she would feel civility was useless.
So little self-awareness did Georgina have, anyone who knew her well felt sorry for her if they had enough insight to see the self-inflicted aspect of the troubles she brought upon herself. A very astute person might see the contempt as a psychological defense mechanism designed to protect her from feelings of failure when relationships did not blossom into friendships. Even though she could manage to get herself hired into well paying jobs, she could not hold onto them so, rich in material possessions, contempt when someone is on their way downwards, is very easy to judge.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Screen of Contempt
 
Georgina Granada lived in a large 4-beroom house in an affluent area of Toronto. She had matching furniture and appliances that were colour-coordinated. She drove 2 cars, belonged to a gym, traveled now and then and afforded luxuries through well paying jobs in her second career in financial advisory services. (Her first was in banking where she rose to the level of Senior Associate.) Pleasingly plump and not unattractive for a woman in her sixties, Georgina kept her short grey hair neat and well cut and was active in solo sports activities like running to keep fit. A devotee of the latest technology, the only humanizing influence in her life was her little terrier, Mutt, whom she doted on and spoiled.
Georgina had unfortunately just lost the third in a series of high paying positions. In her second career, she’d had a position between the first and the second, but it was commission and not as lucrative as had been hoped for. The first, in banking, had been terminated due to lengthy litigation with her employer over discrimination against women that wore out her welcome to put it mildly. The second had been lost due to a gradually increased isolation she had created for herself in order to protect herself from the judgments of others. Being a single older woman she felt out of place at lunch tables where younger women would discuss their marriages and children. Perhaps she didn’t feel she could contribute, but possibly she was jealous of the happiness these women had achieved and so chose to withdraw into her work and personal errands at lunch time. Perhaps, too, excessive amounts of time taken off work might have had a lot to do with her termination. The third she had lost either due to a personality that had become over the years, automatically contentious or to the loss of a contract by her employer. They said they would take her back under different circumstances, but probably the barrage of outraged emails she sent them when they let her go abruptly and unceremoniously will have cut off that opportunity.
Her outrage at this employer was typical of how she reacted in situations where things didn’t go her way. The fault always lay with the other person or persons. They were indescribably “horrible” to her. They were totally lacking in sensitivity and their social graces didn’t meet the bare minimum. Georgina had probably heard of the Roman Maxim: Seek always the golden mean, but she knew it had no application in her life. Any time she tried to be decent to people, they treated her horribly. And there was only one way to deal with conflict in Georgina’s mind: twenty paces, both guns drawn. Even a casual observer might conclude with all the litigation she became embroiled in, she must enjoy it. The many conflicts that came her way often ended up in court and Georgina eventually decided she would like to be a lawyer though the time of life was right for embarking on a new career. This was after she had been charged with mischief and, after hiring the most expensive lawyer in town, been let off with a Peace Bond. She was no angel, this woman. Her motto was tit for tat. If someone blocked her driveway, she would block theirs. If someone, criticized her, she would dish the same back…without giving much thought to the possible validity of the other’s criticism. If a neighbour charged her with assault for turning the hose on them, she would find some by-law infraction they were guilty of and bring the force of city inspectors down on them.
Basically, she treated anyone who dared to oppose her with the utmost contempt. She would run them down in her mind and to anyone willing to listen. Naturally, the person, she might be trying to be civil to would sense her contempt even when unspoken and her efforts at civility would fail. Little wonder she would feel civility was useless.
So little self-awareness did Georgina have, anyone who knew her well felt sorry for her if they had enough insight to see the self-inflicted aspect of the troubles she brought upon herself. A very astute person might see the contempt as a psychological defense mechanism designed to protect her from feelings of failure when relationships did not blossom into friendships. Even though she could manage to get herself hired into well paying jobs, she could not hold onto them so, rich in material possessions, contempt when someone is on their way downwards, is very easy to judge.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Screen of Contempt
 
Georgina Granada lived in a large 4-beroom house in an affluent area of Toronto. She had matching furniture and appliances that were colour-coordinated. She drove 2 cars, belonged to a gym, traveled now and then and afforded luxuries through well paying jobs in her second career in financial advisory services. (Her first was in banking where she rose to the level of Senior Associate.) Pleasingly plump and not unattractive for a woman in her sixties, Georgina kept her short grey hair neat and well cut and was active in solo sports activities like running to keep fit. A devotee of the latest technology, the only humanizing influence in her life was her little terrier, Mutt, whom she doted on and spoiled.
Georgina had unfortunately just lost the third in a series of high paying positions. In her second career, she’d had a position between the first and the second, but it was commission and not as lucrative as had been hoped for. The first, in banking, had been terminated due to lengthy litigation with her employer over discrimination against women that wore out her welcome to put it mildly. The second had been lost due to a gradually increased isolation she had created for herself in order to protect herself from the judgments of others. Being a single older woman she felt out of place at lunch tables where younger women would discuss their marriages and children. Perhaps she didn’t feel she could contribute, but possibly she was jealous of the happiness these women had achieved and so chose to withdraw into her work and personal errands at lunch time. Perhaps, too, excessive amounts of time taken off work might have had a lot to do with her termination. The third she had lost either due to a personality that had become over the years, automatically contentious or to the loss of a contract by her employer. They said they would take her back under different circumstances, but probably the barrage of outraged emails she sent them when they let her go abruptly and unceremoniously will have cut off that opportunity.
Her outrage at this employer was typical of how she reacted in situations where things didn’t go her way. The fault always lay with the other person or persons. They were indescribably “horrible” to her. They were totally lacking in sensitivity and their social graces didn’t meet the bare minimum. Georgina had probably heard of the Roman Maxim: Seek always the golden mean, but she knew it had no application in her life. Any time she tried to be decent to people, they treated her horribly. And there was only one way to deal with conflict in Georgina’s mind: twenty paces, both guns drawn. Even a casual observer might conclude with all the litigation she became embroiled in, she must enjoy it. The many conflicts that came her way often ended up in court and Georgina eventually decided she would like to be a lawyer though the time of life was right for embarking on a new career. This was after she had been charged with mischief and, after hiring the most expensive lawyer in town, been let off with a Peace Bond. She was no angel, this woman. Her motto was tit for tat. If someone blocked her driveway, she would block theirs. If someone, criticized her, she would dish the same back…without giving much thought to the possible validity of the other’s criticism. If a neighbour charged her with assault for turning the hose on them, she would find some by-law infraction they were guilty of and bring the force of city inspectors down on them.
Basically, she treated anyone who dared to oppose her with the utmost contempt. She would run them down in her mind and to anyone willing to listen. Naturally, the person, she might be trying to be civil to would sense her contempt even when unspoken and her efforts at civility would fail. Little wonder she would feel civility was useless.
So little self-awareness did Georgina have, anyone who knew her well felt sorry for her if they had enough insight to see the self-inflicted aspect of the troubles she brought upon herself. A very astute person might see the contempt as a psychological defense mechanism designed to protect her from feelings of failure when relationships did not blossom into friendships. Even though she could manage to get herself hired into well paying jobs, she could not hold onto them so, rich in material possessions, contempt when someone is on their way downwards, is very easy to judge.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Screen of Contempt
 
Georgina Granada lived in a large 4-beroom house in an affluent area of Toronto. She had matching furniture and appliances that were colour-coordinated. She drove 2 cars, belonged to a gym, traveled now and then and afforded luxuries through well paying jobs in her second career in financial advisory services. (Her first was in banking where she rose to the level of Senior Associate.) Pleasingly plump and not unattractive for a woman in her sixties, Georgina kept her short grey hair neat and well cut and was active in solo sports activities like running to keep fit. A devotee of the latest technology, the only humanizing influence in her life was her little terrier, Mutt, whom she doted on and spoiled.
Georgina had unfortunately just lost the third in a series of high paying positions. In her second career, she’d had a position between the first and the second, but it was commission and not as lucrative as had been hoped for. The first, in banking, had been terminated due to lengthy litigation with her employer over discrimination against women that wore out her welcome to put it mildly. The second had been lost due to a gradually increased isolation she had created for herself in order to protect herself from the judgments of others. Being a single older woman she felt out of place at lunch tables where younger women would discuss their marriages and children. Perhaps she didn’t feel she could contribute, but possibly she was jealous of the happiness these women had achieved and so chose to withdraw into her work and personal errands at lunch time. Perhaps, too, excessive amounts of time taken off work might have had a lot to do with her termination. The third she had lost either due to a personality that had become over the years, automatically contentious or to the loss of a contract by her employer. They said they would take her back under different circumstances, but probably the barrage of outraged emails she sent them when they let her go abruptly and unceremoniously will have cut off that opportunity.
Her outrage at this employer was typical of how she reacted in situations where things didn’t go her way. The fault always lay with the other person or persons. They were indescribably “horrible” to her. They were totally lacking in sensitivity and their social graces didn’t meet the bare minimum. Georgina had probably heard of the Roman Maxim: Seek always the golden mean, but she knew it had no application in her life. Any time she tried to be decent to people, they treated her horribly. And there was only one way to deal with conflict in Georgina’s mind: twenty paces, both guns drawn. Even a casual observer might conclude with all the litigation she became embroiled in, she must enjoy it. The many conflicts that came her way often ended up in court and Georgina eventually decided she would like to be a lawyer though the time of life was right for embarking on a new career. This was after she had been charged with mischief and, after hiring the most expensive lawyer in town, been let off with a Peace Bond. She was no angel, this woman. Her motto was tit for tat. If someone blocked her driveway, she would block theirs. If someone, criticized her, she would dish the same back…without giving much thought to the possible validity of the other’s criticism. If a neighbour charged her with assault for turning the hose on them, she would find some by-law infraction they were guilty of and bring the force of city inspectors down on them.
Basically, she treated anyone who dared to oppose her with the utmost contempt. She would run them down in her mind and to anyone willing to listen. Naturally, the person, she might be trying to be civil to would sense her contempt even when unspoken and her efforts at civility would fail. Little wonder she would feel civility was useless.
So little self-awareness did Georgina have, anyone who knew her well felt sorry for her if they had enough insight to see the self-inflicted aspect of the troubles she brought upon herself. A very astute person might see the contempt as a psychological defense mechanism designed to protect her from feelings of failure when relationships did not blossom into friendships. Even though she could manage to get herself hired into well paying jobs, she could not hold onto them so, rich in material possessions, contempt when someone is on their way downwards, is very easy to judge.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Screen of Contempt
 
Georgina Granada lived in a large 4-beroom house in an affluent area of Toronto. She had matching furniture and appliances that were colour-coordinated. She drove 2 cars, belonged to a gym, traveled now and then and afforded luxuries through well paying jobs in her second career in financial advisory services. (Her first was in banking where she rose to the level of Senior Associate.) Pleasingly plump and not unattractive for a woman in her sixties, Georgina kept her short grey hair neat and well cut and was active in solo sports activities like running to keep fit. A devotee of the latest technology, the only humanizing influence in her life was her little terrier, Mutt, whom she doted on and spoiled.
Georgina had unfortunately just lost the third in a series of high paying positions. In her second career, she’d had a position between the first and the second, but it was commission and not as lucrative as had been hoped for. The first, in banking, had been terminated due to lengthy litigation with her employer over discrimination against women that wore out her welcome to put it mildly. The second had been lost due to a gradually increased isolation she had created for herself in order to protect herself from the judgments of others. Being a single older woman she felt out of place at lunch tables where younger women would discuss their marriages and children. Perhaps she didn’t feel she could contribute, but possibly she was jealous of the happiness these women had achieved and so chose to withdraw into her work and personal errands at lunch time. Perhaps, too, excessive amounts of time taken off work might have had a lot to do with her termination. The third she had lost either due to a personality that had become over the years, automatically contentious or to the loss of a contract by her employer. They said they would take her back under different circumstances, but probably the barrage of outraged emails she sent them when they let her go abruptly and unceremoniously will have cut off that opportunity.
Her outrage at this employer was typical of how she reacted in situations where things didn’t go her way. The fault always lay with the other person or persons. They were indescribably “horrible” to her. They were totally lacking in sensitivity and their social graces didn’t meet the bare minimum. Georgina had probably heard of the Roman Maxim: Seek always the golden mean, but she knew it had no application in her life. Any time she tried to be decent to people, they treated her horribly. And there was only one way to deal with conflict in Georgina’s mind: twenty paces, both guns drawn. Even a casual observer might conclude with all the litigation she became embroiled in, she must enjoy it. The many conflicts that came her way often ended up in court and Georgina eventually decided she would like to be a lawyer though the time of life was right for embarking on a new career. This was after she had been charged with mischief and, after hiring the most expensive lawyer in town, been let off with a Peace Bond. She was no angel, this woman. Her motto was tit for tat. If someone blocked her driveway, she would block theirs. If someone, criticized her, she would dish the same back…without giving much thought to the possible validity of the other’s criticism. If a neighbour charged her with assault for turning the hose on them, she would find some by-law infraction they were guilty of and bring the force of city inspectors down on them.
Basically, she treated anyone who dared to oppose her with the utmost contempt. She would run them down in her mind and to anyone willing to listen. Naturally, the person, she might be trying to be civil to would sense her contempt even when unspoken and her efforts at civility would fail. Little wonder she would feel civility was useless.
So little self-awareness did Georgina have, anyone who knew her well felt sorry for her if they had enough insight to see the self-inflicted aspect of the troubles she brought upon herself. A very astute person might see the contempt as a psychological defense mechanism designed to protect her from feelings of failure when relationships did not blossom into friendships. Even though she could manage to get herself hired into well paying jobs, she could not hold onto them so, rich in material possessions, contempt when someone is on their way downwards, is very easy to judge.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Screen of Contempt
 
Georgina Granada lived in a large 4-beroom house in an affluent area of Toronto. She had matching furniture and appliances that were colour-coordinated. She drove 2 cars, belonged to a gym, traveled now and then and afforded luxuries through well paying jobs in her second career in financial advisory services. (Her first was in banking where she rose to the level of Senior Associate.) Pleasingly plump and not unattractive for a woman in her sixties, Georgina kept her short grey hair neat and well cut and was active in solo sports activities like running to keep fit. A devotee of the latest technology, the only humanizing influence in her life was her little terrier, Mutt, whom she doted on and spoiled.
Georgina had unfortunately just lost the third in a series of high paying positions. In her second career, she’d had a position between the first and the second, but it was commission and not as lucrative as had been hoped for. The first, in banking, had been terminated due to lengthy litigation with her employer over discrimination against women that wore out her welcome to put it mildly. The second had been lost due to a gradually increased isolation she had created for herself in order to protect herself from the judgments of others. Being a single older woman she felt out of place at lunch tables where younger women would discuss their marriages and children. Perhaps she didn’t feel she could contribute, but possibly she was jealous of the happiness these women had achieved and so chose to withdraw into her work and personal errands at lunch time. Perhaps, too, excessive amounts of time taken off work might have had a lot to do with her termination. The third she had lost either due to a personality that had become over the years, automatically contentious or to the loss of a contract by her employer. They said they would take her back under different circumstances, but probably


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