Human Personality Control

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Science Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
I use to believe that before I was thrown into any of this utter and chaotic turmoil, I had come from a pretty normal and decent life. I wasn’t absolutely sure, but a part of me felt that there had to have been something before. In this new found world the sun set backwards, the moon fell. It was a peculiar world I inhabited. With soulless eyes, the people looked through me. It was then that I knew I didn’t belong.

Submitted: June 22, 2010

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Submitted: June 22, 2010

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Reaching for my duffel bag, I elongated my body, the tip of my toes pressing against the hard, cold cement. Once I had it in my grips, I snapped back to my original position on top of my bike. The young woman next to me peered over to me curiously. Smiling politely but awkwardly, I clamped my bag closed and then proceeded to stroll down the two-lane bike path. I disliked people sticking their nose in my business, always had. But it was to be expected from these people. It was the only thing they knew how to do. Everyone knew each other and it was this common knowledge that made up these intertwining communities until finally, they were no longer communities but cities, states, cotenants. One cotenant had the possibility of having 4 million connected citizens. It was a very scary thought. “Destination?” a guard prompted, as I stopped at a security check. Lately, rumors had spread of an escape at one of the chronic labs. Pets, they believed. “Home,” I answered short. “Name of corridor.” “Dermon.” “You’re past your curfew,” the guard commented, moving his scanner away from my face and back to the side of his hip. Damn technology. “I just went out to get some last minute groceries.” “You’ve violated curfew approximately 10.2 times.” Unfastening the small door that separated us, he stepped before me, his eyes peering down on my wrist. Automatically, I held it up to his face. “A warning is going to be issued to 1028 on behalf of the Dermon Corridor. Any other violations will be taken in for examination and/or otherwise will suspended until such notice is given of freedom.” His hand was cold as he stamped a half-crescent moon on my arm. Not at all surprised, I let my arm slump to my side and without further conversation pulling my bike under me and dashed off.

“What have a told you?” my mother scolded, pulling my arm to her to take a better look. She sat at her desk. Peering up at me, she pushed her glasses to her eyes in an attempt to look stern. It wasn’t working. “It’s a warning, not a suspension. You don’t have to worry,” I protested, pulling my arm back to me, feeling suddenly self-conscious. Mother shook her head in dismay. Sighing, she stood up. “I know you,” she said, “I know your little ‘tendencies’ and I know that you are going to screw this up. Hannah, this isn’t like the old days! We can’t just be ourselves and hope that the world accepts us.” I stood there, my lower lip quivering. She was only telling me a fact and yet I found it difficult to believe. My mother, exhausted, melted down onto her chair again, placing her hands on her eyes. “Hannah, the world before was corrupted. We needed change and everything we’ve, I’ve been working on has been so that you can grow up happy…” “So, drugging people to act like mindless zombies is your idea of happiness?” I growled. “I only do it because I have to.” “So when you escorted my friends into your office and dosed them, it was only because you had to?” I could hear my voice rise. “Why don’t you just make me like everyone else!” She stared back at me, her eyes looking over me as if she were contemplating doing that very thing. Finally, though, she shook her head violently. “Because I can’t do that!” Her eyes then darted to the ground. I could almost feel the shame. I felt my hands curl up in tight fists, the blood escaping from my fingertips. I was furious. “You’re a coward,” I seethed, “You would gladly transform whole families into perfect citizens but when it comes to your family, you don’t have even the slightest bit of courage.” I didn’t allow her to speak. Instead, I went to the one place that could ease my pain, the Planetarium.

It was a world of its own. It’s dome ceiling allowed rays of sunlight to gently cascade down upon the exhibits and on top of the heads of spectators. It was like no other place with its aura that settled upon you the minute you stepped inside and it was here that I had first realized I was different. I walked leisurely down the hall way towards the back, people zooming past me as if time had suddenly fast forward. He was there to greet me. “Hannah, you’ve just come at the perfect time!” he exclaimed grabbing for my hand. He was Professor, one of the few “special” scientists. Along side my mother, he had assisted in the creation of Defliod. Yet, I felt no harsh feelings towards him. He had only been honest about his aims and I guess it was his honesty that had grown my respect for him. Excitedly, he pulled me into his lab, hieroglyphics aligning each wall. Planets swarmed above me digitally and lights pranced on the ceiling. “It’s only a demo but I think I’ve broken into a secret hid from us for millions of years!” Over-ecstatic, he clapped his hands together and beamed a very prideful smile. Curious, I asked, “And what could that be?” “It’s extraordinary! Positively fascinating!” I peered over to shelves stacked up to the ceiling with books and gadgets that had once held some sort of value, but now sat amidst dust and forgotten possessions. I could here Professor scuffle off to one of the corners of the room, his hands roaming for his latest discovery. So many times had I come here that it seemed daily that a discovery should be made. A small trinket appeared in front of me. “Take a look,” he pronounced in a hurried tone. Gently, I took it into my hand. It was of a cylinder shape with two wires protruding out of the tip. On the surface it felt scratched, but if I looked at it close enough I could make out tiny enchantments. They circled the trinket, seeming almost endless. I glanced up at Professor. “What is it?” “What is it?” he mimicked, sounding surprised, “Why, it’s the way of the future! It’s going to change the way we think of social relations!” “You mean-- “--It’s going to replace the monthly pills given out to our citizens and turn it into once in a lifetime medication!” I could feel my mood shift sharply downward. “Hannah, now we will no longer have to worry about remembering to dose each and every person every single month! No longer shall we have to spend ridiculous amounts of money having to ship supplies in! It’s only going to send us a step forward!” Finally, he took a deep breath. “And last but not least, I will no longer be reminded of my evil work every month…” Professor reached for his handkerchief and patted his forehead. For as long as I could remember Professor had always been very touchy with the idea of HPC or Human Personality Control. Centered around a very deep and uplifting childhood, he felt his morals to be of more in the way than anything else and if he could have had it his way, he would have opted to quit the force. But, of course, there had been no such option. He had been drafted, along side my mother, to conduct in research to find a drug that would induce human reaction and behavior. Since the time of my birth, my mother had always been actively engaged in the science community and only recently had the drug been tested and distributed amongst the nation’s people. But the drug had had side effects. In the first couple of hours, about ¼ of the nation recalled experiencing terrible pains in their chest, throat, head and it was only after their passing that my mother and Professor soon realized their drug was clotting the blood and gelatinizing it until finally, blood could neither reach the heart nor the head. That problem was quickly fixed. They spent many nights in the laboratory, tweaking--alternating until finally, they had found the answer. And on that very night, billions of people were forever changed. I peered down to the floor, unsure of what to think. “Hannah,” Professor said, taking a seat next to me, “I know how you feel on this, but trust me, it has to be done. Too many people were dying. Too many wars were being fought over the most ridiculous things. Human beings are cruel naturally and everyone knew there would come a time when drastic measures would have to be taken. We only did this so people could be safe. Sometimes…human emotion can find its way to the surface and sometimes that can be…well that can be a bad thing.” “Then why not change me? I still have my human emotions. I could cause the next World War.” “Who would you fight with?” he chuckled, trying to lighten up the dense air that seemed to suffocate us. “I don’t belong here, Professor. I feel so out of place when I walk down the street! Everyone--everyone looks so empty. And I feel like I’m hiding some deep and terrible secret and everyone can read it.” “Don’t say that, Hannah. You are an exception. A privilege.”


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