Before the First Snow

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Historical Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
Birmingham. Delano. Chicago. Kent State.
War. The Environment. Worker Exploitation.
Hippies. Yippies. Cops and politicians.

People were singing. People were marching. People were protesting.

The news media reported, editorialized, lampooned, misreported, and scornfully dismissed the new social movements forged from alienation. And then the revolution of the 1960s evolved into the "Me generation."

But one person never lost her principles. Apryl Greene, now in her early 40s, is a musician and freelance photographer for labor unions. While others around her are working to own a piece of America, she continues to try to improve it. Two decades after the revolution of the 1960s, she wants to build the first school for peace and the arts. But, powerful forces from both private industry and the government have already begun a process to legally seize the 40 acres of land she owns in rural northeastern Pennsylvania, and to destroy her dream, while the nation is rushing to war in the Middle East, torn between its dependence upon oil and myriad problems of “clean” nuclear energy.

Into her life comes social activist David Ascher, cynical, liberal, and burdened with the responsibilities of being executive editor of one of the nation's largest magazines. On tour to promote his book about revolutionary journalists, he's looking for another story; she's after something more important.

Together, they are driven to find out who are trying to seize her land; more important, why.

Award-winning journalist Walter M. Brasch meticulously builds a scenario of greed, corruption, and intrigue, set against the backdrop of social protest, and in so doing, weaves a compelling story of history and contemporary American culture and values.

Table of Contents

Before the First Snow

Submitted: May 07, 2011

Birmingham. Delano. Chicago. Kent State.
War. The Environment. Worker Exploitation.
Hippies. Yippies. Cops and politicians.

People were singing. People were marching. People were protesting.

The news media reported, editorialized, lampooned, misreported, and scornfully dismissed the new social movements forged from alienation. And then the revolution of the 1960s evolved into the "Me generation."

But one person never lost her principles. Apryl Greene, now in her early 40s, is a musician and freelance photographer for labor unions. While others around her are working to own a piece of America, she continues to try to improve it. Two decades after the revolution of the 1960s, she wants to build the first school for peace and the arts. But, powerful forces from both private industry and the government have already begun a process to legally seize the 40 acres of land she owns in rural northeastern Pennsylvania, and to destroy her dream, while the nation is rushing to war in the Middle East, torn between its dependence upon oil and myriad problems of “clean” nuclear energy.

Into her life comes social activist David Ascher, cynical, liberal, and burdened with the responsibilities of being executive editor of one of the nation's largest magazines. On tour to promote his book about revolutionary journalists, he's looking for another story; she's after something more important.

Together, they are driven to find out who are trying to seize her land; more important, why.

Award-winning journalist Walter M. Brasch meticulously builds a scenario of greed, corruption, and intrigue, set against the backdrop of social protest, and in so doing, weaves a compelling story of history and contemporary American culture and values.
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